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Project Details

An Indian woman and her child attending a health centre

eHealth centre

A health clinic in a container brings medicine and care closer to remote villages in the developing world.

By Hewlett Packard Living Progress

Project URL: www8.hp.com/us/en/hp-information/social-innovation/ehealth-center.html#.U2vHtIXvZmM
Project Twitter: @hpglobalcitizen

Organisation URL: www8.hp.com/us/en/hp-information/global-citizenship/index.html
Organisation Twitter: @@hp

  • Health
  • Social Exclusion
  • Data
  • Physical Computing

The container sitting in the small town of Chausala, in the Indian state of Maharashtra, looks much like any other. It carries little sign of the innovation contained within it.

The Chausala container is a health clinic in a box that could bring low-cost but high-quality healthcare to small towns and villages in parts of the developing world, where access to healthcare facilities and professionals is difficult and costly.

The eHealth Centre (eHC) can be transported by air, rail or land to rural areas. It supports better healthcare with a dedicated telemedicine studio so community health workers and paramedics can use video conferencing to consult doctors working at a distance. Specially designed diagnostic equipment can also automatically upload data to a remote cloud-based system, to be accessed by doctors working in urban hospitals.

The system also collects comprehensive patient data including demographics, medical history and diagnostics. This can then be used for medical research, tracking disease patterns and their related risk factors.

The “clinic in a container” was created by a collaboration bringing together the computer company HP and the Council of Scientific & Industrial Research (CSIR) in India.

The demand for these kinds of localised, low-cost solutions that use digital technologies to link community health workers to urban centres of knowledge and expertise is huge. In Chausala, a town of about 10,000 people, the eHC was visited by 4,000 people in its first 100 days, including drawing visitors from neighbouring villages.

Image 'BloodPressure' courtesy of iwishmynamewasmarsha

Last updated: 09th of May, 2014

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